Polish Expo 2010 Exposition Pavilion


Polish Folk Papercut
WWA Architects,Poland
Marcin Mostafa and Natalia Paszkowska
website: WWA Architects

Project: Polish Pavilion for Shanghai Expo 2010
Area: 2400 sqm
Year: design 2007, construction 2010
Collaboration: Wojciech Kakowski, Maciej Siczek, Maciej Walczyna, Mikołaj Molenda
Polish EXPO 2010 Exposition Pavilion
Polish EXPO 2010 Exposition Pavilion

Polish Pavilion for Shanghai Expo 2010Polish Pavilion for Shanghai Expo 2010
Polish_EXPO_2010_Pavilion_4

Polish Pavilion for Shanghai Expo 2010 at Night
Polish Pavilion for Shanghai Expo 2010 at Night

1) external layer/plywood, 2) structure/steel, 3) internal layer/PC panels
Polish Pavilion for Shanghai Expo 2010 at Nigh
Polish Pavilion for Shanghai Expo 2010 Papercut
Polish Pavilion for Shanghai Expo 2010 Papercut
Polish Pavilion for Shanghai Expo 2010 at Night
Polish Pavilion for Shanghai Expo 2010 at Night
Polish_EXPO_2010_Pavilion_9
Polish Pavilion for Shanghai Expo 2010 at Night
Polish Pavilion for Shanghai Expo 2010 at Night
Polish Pavilion for Shanghai Expo 2010 Cross-SectionPolish Pavilion for Shanghai Expo 2010 Ground Level
Polish Pavilion for Shanghai Expo 2010 Level 01Polish Pavilion for Shanghai Expo 2010 Level 02
Polish Pavilion for Shanghai Expo 2010 Facade

Marcin Mostafa and Natalia Paszkowska

Polish Pavilion for Shanghai Expo 2010 Entrance Ticket
THE PROJECT CONCEPT

“In the contemporary world with its abundance of visual experience, with the pictorial language of communication reigning supreme, with the almost unconstrained and instant accessibility of iconographic material, an exposition piece of architecture will only be attractive insofar it can offer perceptual sensations attainable only through direct, unmediated exposure to out-of-the-ordinary, singular stimuli, insofar it can provide a quality of experience born out of the chemistry of inter-sensory stimulation. Given the nature of the exposition, the exhibition facility has to denote, by its esthetic distinctiveness, the country of origin, has to constitute, by the strength of its stylistic connotations, an evocative, recognizable and memorable cultural ideogram. In our design, the cultural idiom is primarily conveyed through the theme, the motif of folk-art paper cut-out. Or, more precisely, through a rendering of the motif, a transcription of an elementary esthetic code into the contemporary language of architectural décor. The transcription rationale was twofold. First of all, we did not wish the design to be literally folklorish, a mechanical multiplication of convention-approved set patterns. The intention was for the structure décor to draw on and make reference to tradition, but ultimately to be that tradition’s contemporary reinterpretation, a creative extension into the present day by way of inspiration rather than replication. Secondly, we aspired to make the structure in its own right, in a purely architectural dimension, a significant landmark, a showcase of Polish design achievements. That it should be an attractive, eye-catching exterior both in daylight, against the panorama of other Expo facilities, as well as a mesmerizing experience at night with the edifice drawn by the multi-colored light seeping through the cut-out patterns. And reversely, that it should provide inside visitors with comparable experience by shaping the outer skin patterning in such a way that the sun rays shining through would chisel, by light and shade, the space under the vault. The structure’s overall shape, with many slanting planes, on the one hand complements and rounds out, by the suggestion of a folded sheet of paper, the ‘cut-out’ narrative, on the other creates inside a geometrically intriguing and flexible space that can be creatively apportioned, by inner divisions, to different exhibition, performance and utility functions and uses.”

2 Comments

  1. gininitaly

    Absolutely love this…. talk about taking something out of the box!!! Bravo, modernism with a soul.. and light, space and appropriate to it’s calling. But just a step farther…. would love to see this in the upright real rectangular world… what a pleasure to the heart, you made planes and lines… human and tender.

  2. Mazie Hirono

    This is a really good web site filled with tons of info. This specific article is my favorite.

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